exercise from home- O2 Living blog makers of organic cold-pressed fruit and vegetable Living Juice

Staying Active While Working From Home

With the rise of remote work, many individuals now find themselves spending extended hours at home, often in sedentary positions. While working from home offers convenience and flexibility, it can also lead to a more sedentary lifestyle, which can have negative consequences on our physical and mental well-being. In this blog, we will explore effective ways to stay active while working from home, helping you maintain a healthy balance between work and physical fitness.

 

The Risks of Inactivity

Prolonged periods of inactivity can have adverse effects on our health. Sedentary behavior has been linked to increased risks of obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and musculoskeletal problems (1). Furthermore, a lack of physical activity can contribute to mental health issues such as stress, anxiety, and depression (2). By remaining physically active throughout the day, we can mitigate these risks and improve our overall well-being.

 

Set Up a Standing Desk

One simple yet effective way to incorporate physical activity into your work-from-home routine is by using a standing desk. Standing while working can help improve posture, increase calorie expenditure, and reduce the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders associated with prolonged sitting (3). Consider investing in an adjustable standing desk or create your own DIY version by elevating your computer on a sturdy surface, such as a stack of books.

exercise from home- O2 Living blog makers of organic cold-pressed fruit and vegetable Living Juice

Take Active Breaks

Instead of remaining glued to your chair for hours on end, take short active breaks to get your body moving. Schedule regular breaks every hour and use them to engage in quick exercises or stretching routines. Simple activities like walking around the room, doing a few squats or lunges, or even dancing to your favorite tunes can help increase blood flow, boost energy levels, and relieve muscle tension.

 

Incorporate Mini Workouts

Integrate mini workouts into your daily routine to stay active while working from home. These can include exercises that can be performed while seated, such as leg lifts, calf raises, or ankle rotations. Engaging in these mini workouts throughout the day helps improve circulation, prevent stiffness, and strengthen muscles. You can also consider investing in resistance bands or small hand weights for added resistance during exercises.

 

Utilize Fitness Apps and Online Classes

There is a wealth of fitness apps and online workout classes available that cater to various fitness levels and preferences. Utilize these resources to find workouts that suit your needs, whether it's yoga, Pilates, high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or dance workouts. These virtual options provide the flexibility to fit exercise sessions into your daily routine without leaving the comfort of your home.

 

Opt for Active Transportation

If you need to run errands or go grocery shopping, consider incorporating active transportation into your routine. Instead of relying solely on your car, choose to walk or cycle whenever possible. This not only provides an opportunity for physical activity but also contributes to reducing your carbon footprint and improving the environment.

 

Working from home doesn't have to mean being sedentary and compromising your physical well-being. By implementing these tips and finding creative ways to stay active, you can maintain a healthy work-life balance. Remember, even small bouts of physical activity can make a significant difference in your overall health. So, stand up, stretch, and get moving to boost your productivity, energy levels, and overall wellness while working from home.

References:

  1. Diaz KM, Howard VJ, Hutto B, et al. Patterns of Sedentary Behavior and Mortality in U.S. Middle-Aged and Older Adults: A National Cohort Study. Ann Intern Med. 2017;167(7):465-475.
  2. Schuch FB, Vancampfort D, Firth J, et al. Physical Activity and Incident Depression: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Am J Psychiatry. 2018;175(7):631-648.
  3. Shrestha N, Kukkonen-Harjula KT, Verbeek JH, et al. Workplace interventions for reducing sitting at work. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2018;6(6):CD010912.
See all articles in News